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Thursday, February 15, 2018

Hurricane Shutters Only Help Against Debris

Hurricane Shutters Only Help Against Debris


Replace Inferior Hurricane Shutters

If your home has only hurricane shutters over your windows, then you may have experienced some benefits and drawbacks during the hurricane season. Hurricane shutters may protect your home from debris impact, but they will not seal your home against rain or wind damage. Hurricane impact windows will protect your home against storm debris, rains, and winds by creating a tight seal that keeps water and wind out. Impact windows will also deter burglars who try to break into your home, which will keep your house and family protected year-round.

Receive Insurance Benefits

Living in Florida makes it necessary to purchase higher home insurance to cover various damages and costs that might occur during the seasonal hurricanes. However, with simple additions to your home, your insurance will often reduce your premiums. These home improvements, like impact windows and storm doors, are protective measures that will keep your home safe from unnecessary damages. Insurance companies will often reward their members for taking the extra steps to protect their home and family.

Increase Energy Efficiency

You may also find additional monetary benefits when your energy bill arrives every month. Hurricane impact windows are also energy efficient, because they keep your home sealed against hot or cold air that might enter or escape your home. You can also reduce the amount of heat that enters your home with ultraviolet-resistant window glass. This type of glass will keep the sun’s heat and damaging rays from invading your home and increasing your home’s interior temperature. As a result, you could save between 15% and 25% on your energy bills.



The Window Professionals are a full service company and we offer no down, 100% financing through Ygrene and the PACE program.

If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami. We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years. If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.
Please visit our showrooms: Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com Call (561) 745 6122
Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484

Thursday, February 8, 2018

We all Need to be Storm Preppers! Get Ready Florida

We all Need to be Storm Preppers!  Get Ready Florida
By Ron Hurtibise
Sun Sentinel
Insurance wonks Jay Neal and Paul Handerhan want to make hurricane and flood readiness cool.
The duo, who have been working together since 2011 as principals of the Fort Lauderdale-based Florida Association for Insurance Reform, are bringing their reputations as peacemakers and persuaders to the effort to convince Floridians that we need to bite the bullet and invest in protecting our homes from hurricanes and flooding.
On Feb. 10, they’ll reach one of their largest audiences when the TV special “Get Ready, Florida!” airs on WFOR-TV, the Miami-based CBS affiliate that broadcasts on Ch. 4. The 30-minute special, set for 7:30 p.m., is designed to urge property owners not to wait until the beginning of hurricane season, but rather to focus on preparation right now, during the calm winter and spring months.
“We typically wait until June and say, ‘Now is the time to prepare,’” said Handerhan, FAIR’s senior vice president for public policy. “But that’s too late, especially if you are planning a storm hardening project that requires selecting a contractor, getting financing in order, and getting proper credits from your insurance company.”
Hosted by Craig Fugate, former director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the special will cover how hurricane deductibles work and why homeowners should purchase flood insurance. It also describes an additional level of coverage — called parametric insurance — that covers what a homeowner policy doesn’t cover, including the deductible, debris removal, dock repairs, evacuation expenses, food, gas, generator rentals and more.
'New normal' requires year-round hurricane preparedness mindset, advocates urge
Impact window selection and financing options will be discussed as well, and viewers will be shown how storm-resistant windows are made and installed.
The special was co-produced by FAIR’s new consumer education offshoot, FAIR Foundation, and Sachs Media Group, which has produced hurricane-preparation specials for two decades.
Education is one of the primary missions of the FAIR Foundation, formed last year, Neal and Handerhan said.
Residents of Florida communities most vulnerable to storm surge must be educated about the need to maintain flood insurance coverage, regardless of whether FEMA’s flood zone maps say they live in special hazard zones where flood insurance is required for homeowners with federally-backed mortgages, said Neal, FAIR’s president and CEO.
Six of the top 10 U.S. metro areas most vulnerable to storm surge are in Florida: Miami, Tampa, Cape Coral, Bradenton, Naples and Jacksonville. Of 2.4 million homes in those metro areas, 1 million have no flood insurance, according to information on the FAIR Foundation website from the 2016 CoreLogic Storm Surge Risk Report.
Consumers and workers in the insurance industry need to know more about how to better prepare for hurricanes and the coming effects of climate change, including more frequent and intense hurricanes, but also increased flooding from summer rainstorms, Neal and Handerhan said. Many South Florida residents don’t yet realize that inland flooding will become more frequent as the water table rises more often through porous limestone found in many parts of the region, they said.
Insurance reform group seeks national commissioner search
Consumers also need to be reminded that they’ll get a return on their investment in impact windows and a new or reinforced roof, Neal said. The improvements would lower the price of their insurance and utility bills.
The FAIR Foundation website has a tool that allows consumers to see how much money they will save.
“They want people talking about impact windows at their next party,” said Lisa Miller, an insurance industry consultant and one of FAIR’s earliest supporters. “They want homeowners competing not to see who can get the fanciest granite counter tops but who will be the first to install hurricane-resistant roof straps and asphalt shingles.”
More home-insurance companies are looking at your credit
The foundation has created a subsidiary called FAIR Insurance Trust to broker policies and invest the sales commissions into its education campaign. “Our goal is to reduce uninsured risk by half,” Neal said.
There’s also the FAIR Certified Partner Program to enable real estate and insurance agents to co-brand an insurance buying guidebook, “Wise Up Florida,” to give to customers, Neal said.
This year, FAIR plans to open an office in Washington, D.C., to promote preparedness through legislation, Neal said. They’d like Congress to add flood mitigation improvements to the storm hardening and energy saving projects that homeowners can finance through the Property Assessed Clean Energy program. FAIR has been a longtime supporter of PACE, which enables homeowners to fund improvements with financing repaid through their property tax bills.
Handerhan formed FAIR in 2010, soon after representing the Florida Association of Public Insurance Adjusters in a legislative battle against a group of insurance companies.
While sharing dinner in 2008 with Miller, a insurance industry lobbyist, Handerhan wondered why the sides couldn’t seem to compromise over anything. He decided to create a nonprofit organization focused on putting policyholders’ interests first by cajoling often-warring interests to sit down together and look for common ground.
Neal, who had owned an insurance agency in Tennessee, moved to Florida after the 2008 recession and joined Handerhan in 2011. They helped to referee numerous issues embroiling the industry at the time, including the sinkhole crisis and policyholders angered over how the state handled depopulation of state-run Citizens Property Insurance Corp.
They found willing listeners among insurance company CEOs, state insurance regulators, trial lawyers, public adjusters, construction contractors and state legislators. They also intervened on behalf of individual insurance customers.
Neal remembers a Tampa area couple who had credit insurance on their home — that’s insurance that pays off a mortgage if one of the mortgagees dies. The husband found out he was terminally ill and the credit insurance company had suddenly canceled their policy.
“I’d never heard that a company could just cancel a policy like that,” Neal said. “I consulted with experts, got the insurance consumer advocate involved, and it turned out hundreds of other customers were in the same boat. We got involved and got [their policies] reinstated.”
FAIR recruited board members from most of the interest groups it worked with and found regular donors among organizations that acknowledged the value of its role.
“FAIR brings together very disparate groups of folks, which is unusual in today’s political world,” said Locke Burt, CEO of Security First Insurance and a financial supporter of FAIR. “The American public, I think, would like to see more of that.”
Miller said she looks forward to seeing what Neal and Handerhan can accomplish with the FAIR Foundation’s storm preparedness goals. “Their mission is to make mitigation as cool as Starbucks,” she said.
The Window Professionals are a full service company and we offer no down, 100% financing through Ygrene and the PACE program.

If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami.  We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years.  If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.

Please visit our showrooms:

Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com 
Call (561) 745 6122
Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484


Thursday, January 25, 2018

Replacement Window Basics You Must Know

Replacement Window Basics You Must Know

Unless you have owned a house for a number of years, you may never have had any need to know about replacement windows. They are not something that enters your mode of thinking - until it is too late. By that time, rainwater is pouring into your house, drafts are blowing, and visitors commenting that your "Windows need painting."

1. When Your Window Is Too Far Gone, It Is Time To Use a New Construction Window


If the area around the window is so rotted out as to be structurally unsound, then you will use a new construction window. In addition to putting in the new construction window, you would construct a substantial frame around the window to hold it in place.

2. Save Money By Purchasing Single Hung Rather Than Double Hung Windows?


Both single and double hung windows are the types that have a lower sash (a pane) that slides upward.  When the house gets too hot, you unlatch the window and slide that sash up.
 Air wafts through the screen.  You know the routine.
But with single hung windows, the upper sash is fixed in place, inoperable.  Only the lower sash slides up and down.  With double hung windows, both sashes can move.  This is especially valuable for upper story windows because it allows you to clean windows from the inside.
 Also, if you have small children, you can open the upper sash only.
But if neither conditions apply to you, there is little reason to buy double hung windows.  You will save money with the single hung windows.  Plus, with less moving parts, the single hungs have less of a chance of failure.

3. Sometimes You Can Fix The Window, Rendering Replacement Unnecessary


Many homeowners, experiencing high energy costs, jump the gun and pull out all of their windows and replace them. In some cases, this is premature.
The seals on the existing double-glazed windows may have failed, allowing cold or heat to more easily pass into the house because crucial argon or krypton gas has escaped.  In this case, it is quite simple to repair the window, saving money and effort.

4. Any Season Is Window Replacement Season


If replacement window companies only installed in "optimal conditions" such as spring and summer, they would go out of business.
Window technicians may be less than happy about it--but you can get your windows replaced in winter, in cold, in snow, in ice--in anything short of a blizzard.
One problem, though, is that you may not get the best installation. If the technician is uncomfortable, he may rush the job through. Caulking may not set well in extreme conditions. Moisture can affect the tight tolerances related to window installation.
Good companies know how to work through these problems.
One downside of scheduling during temperate seasons is that everyone else is doing the same thing. You may find yourself in a long queue for installation, or you may not even be able to get in during that period.

5. Replacement Is Not a DIY Project


Replacement windows are a prime example of why it is sometimes nice to have professionals take on a home improvement project.
Pro window installer do this job day in and day out, and they have the tools and skills needed to knock it out in minutes instead of hours or days. In theory, a homeowner can save money by replacing his or her own windows, but by the time you have mastered your learning curve, you are practically finished with the entire project.

6. Replacement Costs Will Be Far Higher Than You Can Imagine


How much it costs to replace your windows depends on many factors: locale, window materials, type of glazing, installer, and so on. But it is safe to assume that most homeowners will not escape a whole-house window replacement for less than $10,000.
Some homeowners cut costs by hiring a handyman and having him replace the windows. You may save some money. But because the pro window installers have perfected the installation process (and often come in with crews of 10 or more men), the amount of money you save will not be as much as you think, and you certainly will not save time. One nice thing: replacement windows have great resale value when it comes time to sell your house.

7. Window Materials Are Important


Homeowners concerned about maintaining the "classic" look of their own house naturally will reject the idea of installing vinyl windows in favor wood materials.
But vinyl windows are worth a second glance. Vinyl framing materials inhibit energy loss, don't require sealing or painting, and a much cheaper than wood. Metal windows are often architecturally necessary (to match the style of contemporary homes), but they tend to be the worst for energy savings.

8. Double Pane Windows Are Standard


A double pane window, or double-glazed window, is two sheets of glass with an air or inert gas (krypton, argon, etc.) layer in the middle.
A double pane window can increase your energy efficiency by almost 100%. 
...a single pane glazed window has an approximate R-value of 0.85, while a double pane glazed window has a value of 1.5 - 2.0, a low-e double pane glazed window has a 2.4 - 3.0 rating and a low-e double pane glazed window using an argon gas fill has a 2.7 - 3.6 R-value.
For walls and attics, an R-value of 1 to 2 is not impressive. These areas are typically filled with fiberglass insulation, with R-values of 13 or greater.  But within the world of windows, an R-value of 2 is decent.
The fact remains: double pane windows are becoming standard, even in parts of the country that are not ordinarily thought of as having extreme climates.

9. Sure, You Can Enlarge That Window (But Carpentry Is Involved)


As you might suspect, it's no easy task to enlarge a window opening to accommodate a newer, larger-sized window. But does it require ripping out all of the wallboard and siding?
Thankfully, the answer is...No.
When you enlarge a window opening up to eight inches horizontally, you can keep the same header and sill (the top and bottom parts of the window) and just install one new vertical stud to either side of the window.
Yes, this means ripping out wallboard from floor to ceiling, but width-wise you only need to take out a foot or two, at most. This section of wallboard comes out to accommodate the new stud. And no exterior siding ever has to be removed.
It's always easier to order smaller sized windows than enlarging a window opening. But if you have to enlarge, it's certainly a manageable task.

Summary


Few homeowners who have been through the replacement window installation process will say that they care to repeat it. After all, it is necessary to invite 3-5 companies into your home to give quotes, and then invite one of those companies back to spend 2 or 3 days installing the windows (which necessitates being on the premises the entire time ). It is work, but worthwhile. Your house looks better and feels better. Your next round of energy bills will be 10% lower. Your house is quieter.

The Window Professionals are a full service company and we offer no down, 100% financing through Ygrene and the PACE program.

If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami.  We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years.  If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.

Please visit our showrooms:

Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com 
Call (561) 745 6122
Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Existing Windows

Improving the Energy Efficiency of Existing Windows
You can improve the energy efficiency of existing windows by adding storm windows, caulking and weatherstripping, and using window treatments or coverings.
Adding storm windows can reduce air leakage and improve comfort. Caulking and weatherstripping can reduce air leakage around windows. Use caulk for stationary cracks, gaps, or joints less than one-quarter-inch wide, and weatherstripping for building components that move, such as doors and operable windows. Window treatments or coverings can reduce heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the summer. Most window treatments, however, aren't effective at reducing air leakage or infiltration.

Cold Weather Window Tips

  • Use a heavy-duty, clear plastic sheet on a frame or tape clear plastic film to the inside of your window frames to reduce drafts.
  • Install tight-fitting, insulating window shades on windows that feel drafty after weatherizing.
  • Close your curtains and shades at night to protect against cold drafts; open them during the day to let in warming sunlight.
  • Install exterior or interior storm windows, which can reduce heat loss through the windows by approximately 10%-20%, depending on the type of window already installed in the home. They should have weatherstripping at all movable joints; be made of strong, durable materials; and have interlocking or overlapping joints.
  • Repair and weatherize your current storm windows, if necessary.

Warm Weather Window Tips

  • Install white window shades, drapes, or blinds to reflect heat away from the house.
  • Close curtains on south- and west-facing windows during the day.
  • Install awnings on south- and west-facing windows.
  • Apply sun-control or other reflective films on south-facing windows to reduce solar heat gain.

Selecting New Energy-Efficient Windows

If your home has very old and/or inefficient windows, it might be more cost-effective to replace them than to try to improve their energy efficiency. New, energy-efficient windows eventually pay for themselves through lower heating and cooling costs, and sometimes even lighting costs.
When properly selected and installed, energy-efficient windows can help minimize your heating, cooling, and lighting costs. Improving window performance in your home involves design, selection, and installation.

Design

Before selecting new windows for your home, determine what types of windows will work best and where to improve your home's energy efficiency. It's a good idea to understand the energy performance ratings of windows so you’ll know what energy performance ratings you need for your windows based on your climate and the home's design.
For labeling energy-efficient windows, ENERGY STAR® has established minimum energy performance rating criteria by climate. However, these criteria don't account for a home's design, such as window orientation.
Windows are an important element in passive solar home design, which uses solar energy at the site to provide heating, cooling, and lighting for a house. Passive solar design strategies vary by building location and regional climate, but the basic window guidelines remain the same—select, orient, and size glass to maximize solar heat gain in winter and minimize it in summer.
In heating-dominated climates, major glazing areas should generally face south to collect solar heat during the winter when the sun is low in the sky. In the summer, when the sun is high overhead, overhangs or other shading devices prevent excessive heat gain.
To be effective, south-facing windows should have a solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of greater than 0.6 to maximize solar heat gain during the winter, a U-factor of 0.35 or less to reduce conductive heat transfer, and a high visible transmittance (VT) for good visible light transfer. See Energy Performance Ratings to learn more about these ratings.
Windows on east-, west-, and north-facing walls should be minimized while still allowing for adequate daylight. It is difficult to control heat and light through east- and west-facing windows when the sun is low in the sky, and these windows should have a low SHGC and/or be shaded. North-facing windows collect little solar heat, so they are used only for lighting. Low-emissivity (low-e) window glazing can help control solar heat gain and loss in heating climates.
In cooling climates, particularly effective strategies include preferential use of north-facing windows and generously shaded south-facing windows. Windows with low SHGCs are more effective at reducing cooling loads.
Some types of glazing help reduce solar heat gain, lowering a window's SHGC. Low-e coatings—microscopically thin, virtually invisible metal or metallic oxide layers deposited directly on the surface of glass—control heat transfer through windows with insulated glazing. Tinted glass absorbs a large fraction of incoming solar radiation through a window, reflective coatings reduce the transmission of solar radiation, and spectrally selective coatings filter out 40% to 70% of the heat normally transmitted through insulated window glass or glazing, while allowing the full amount of light to be transmitted. Except for spectrally selective, these types of glazing also lower a window's VT. See Window Types to learn more about glazing, coatings, tints, and other options when selecting efficient windows.
If you're constructing a new home or doing some major remodeling, you should also take advantage of the opportunity to incorporate your window design and selection as an integral part of your whole-house design—an approach for building an energy-efficient home.

Selection

You'll find that you have several options to consider when selecting what type of windows you should use in your home.
When selecting windows for energy efficiency, it's important to first consider their energy performance ratings in relation to your climate and your home's design. This will help narrow your selection. Select windows with both low U-factors and low SHGCs to maximize energy savings in temperate climates with both cold and hot seasons. Look for whole-unit U-factors and SHGCs, rather than center-of-glass (COG) U-factors and SHGCs. Whole-unit numbers more accurately reflect the energy performance of the entire product. 
A window's energy efficiency is dependent upon all of its components. Window frames conduct heat, contributing to a window's overall energy efficiency, particularly its U-factor. Glazing or glass technologies have become very sophisticated, and designers often specify different types of glazing or glass for different windows, based on orientation, climate, building design, etc.
Another important consideration is how the windows operate, because some operating types have lower air leakage rates than others, which will improve your home's energy efficiency. Traditional operating types include:
  • Awning. Hinged at the top and open outward. Because the sash closes by pressing against the frame, they generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows.
  • Casement. Hinged at the sides. Like awning windows, they generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows because the sash closes by pressing against the frame.
  • Fixed. Fixed panes that don't open. When installed properly they're airtight, but are not suitable in places where window ventilation is desired.
  • Hopper. Hinged at the bottom and open inward. Like both awning and casement, they generally have lower air leakage rates because the sash closes by pressing against the frame.
  • Single- and double-hung. Both sashes slide vertically in a double-hung window. Only the bottom sash slides upward in a single-hung window. These sliding windows generally have higher air leakage rates than projecting or hinged windows.
  • Single- and double-sliding. Both sashes slide horizontally in a double-sliding window. Only one sash slides in a single-sliding window. Like single- and double-hung windows, they generally have higher air leakage rates than projecting or hinged windows.

Installation

Even the most energy-efficient window must be properly installed to ensure energy efficiency. Therefore, it's best to have a professional install your windows.
Window installation varies depending on the type of window, the construction of the house (wood, masonry, etc.), the exterior cladding (wood siding, stucco, brick, etc.), and the type (if any) of weather-restrictive barrier.
Windows should be installed according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and be properly air sealed during installation to perform correctly. To air seal the window, caulk the frame and weatherstrip the operable components.

Article from Energy.gov



The Window Professionals are a full service company and we offer no down, 100% financing through Ygrene and the PACE program.

If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami.  We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years.  If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.

Please visit our showrooms:
 
Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com 
Call (561) 745 6122

Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Happy New Year from the Window Professionals in Jupiter & Miami Florida

Happy New Year!



The Window Professionals have been helping homeowners and area builders with all of their window and door needs since 1989.

We offer only the best in quality windows and doors for all your needs from some of the biggest names in the industry.

Our staff is very knowledgeable and trained to answer all of your questions.  We are always learning and educating ourselves on the latest innovations in windows and doors. 

With the start of the new year, now is a great time to take an assessment of your homes windows and doors.

Upgrading to new impact windows and doors can add value to your home and lower your electric bills.

We are a full service company and we offer no down, 100% financing through Ygrene and the PACE program.

If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami.  We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years.  If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.

Please visit our showrooms:
 
Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com 
Call (561) 745 6122

Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

The Window Professionals offer PACE Program to Finance Windows & Doors for Homeowners

The Window Professionals offer PACE Program to Finance Windows & Doors for Homeowners


Are you in need of quality windows and doors and are not sure about how you are going to afford the upgrades.

Then you need to take a look at PACE.

PACE is a program that offers 100% low interest financing based on your home's equity not your credit score or financial statements.

Your improvements are financed with low interest loans that are paid for on your property taxes. The process is very simple as long as you have equity in your home. 

This program is offered to our financing partner Ygrene and provides 100%, no money down, PACE financing for window and door improvements to your home.

This program has been available in Dade and Broward counties for the past few years and is now available in Palm Beach County.

This a hassle free way to get new windows and doors, just set up an appointment, our helpful sales professionals will guide you through the whole process. You don't have to pull permits, deal with installers or have any hassles, just leave it up to the professionals, the Window Professionals. 





If you have any questions about windows or doors please stop by our beautiful showroom in Jupiter and in Miami.  We can answer any questions you may have, we have been helping people with their windows and doors in South Florida for over 25 years.  If you want it done right, think the Window Professionals.

Please visit our showrooms:
 
Jupiter: 1319 Jupiter Park Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458 www.windowprofessionals.com 
Call (561) 745 6122

Miami: 10001 S. Dixie Hwy, Miami, FL 33156 www.windowprofessionals.com
Call (305) 669 4484